Grant Writing Advice and Tips: The Grant Helpers Blog

Grants for Art and Music Education

Posted by Lauren Albright on Thu, Sep 27, 2018 @ 12:09 PM

Grants for Art and Music Education
Arts Education
“Where words fail, music speaks.”
–Hans Christian Andersen

“A work of art is above all an adventure of the mind.”
-Eugene Ionesco

It is well established that art and music education help students develop and excel in many important physical, mental, and social learning aspects.
Yet these education programs are often the first on the chopping block when federal, state, and school organizations struggle with dwindling education budgets. For those schools and teachers struggling to maintain crucial art and music programs due to financial constraints, grants are one of many great resources for support.

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The National Endowment for the Arts

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) funds new and existing projects that promote the arts. NEA grants are available to non-profit organizations, state or local government agencies, school districts, and federally-recognized tribal communities or tribes; all applicant entities must have at least a three-year prior history of arts programming.

Two of the NEA’s four annual grants are currently open for the 2018 cycle: 

  • Art Works Grant: This grant funds projects that explore how art relates to and enriches various cultures and their beliefs and values. Award amounts are typically between $10,000 and $100,000, and grant awardees must cost share/match the award amount. This grant typically has two deadlines annually: one in late February and one in late July.
  • Challenge America Grant: This grant supports projects that make the arts more available to underprivileged individuals and areas. Award amounts are for up to $10,000, and grant awardees must cost share / match the award amount. The deadline for this grant usually in late April.

The Mr. Holland's Opus Foundation

In the spirit of its namesake 1995 movie about the inspiring effects of high school music education programs, The Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation offers instrument grants to low-income or otherwise underprivileged schools. Grants are typically provided either to minimize or eliminate instrument sharing or to replace aging, ineffective instruments. Applications are by invitation only. Please review the Foundation’s website for more information on school eligibility requirements and to contact the Foundation for further information about becoming an invited grant applicant.

Lily Sarah Grace

This organization’s Stepping Stone Grant provides funding to K-5 educators who want to integrate the arts into their existing classroom curricula. All program proposals must follow Lily Sarah Grace’s distinctive “Arts-infused, inquiry-based learning” model (AIIBL), which focuses on five critical aspects or outcomes of art-integration in the classroom: community, collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, and communication. All K-5, Title I schools / educators are eligible to apply for these small grants of up to $450.  The application deadline is typically at the end of April each year. For more information on the Stepping Stone Grant’s unique requirements, including the grant proposal rubric, please visit the website link above.

The Crewe Foundation

The Crew Foundation provides monetary support for initiatives that help underprivileged children identify and develop their artistic and musical talents. Only non-profit organizations in the state of Maine that have existing, devoted fine arts or music programs may apply. Applications are due December 31st of each year, decisions are made by April 30th of the following year, and funds are subsequently dispersed between June 30th and September 30th.

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Need money, supplies, or other resources to help keep the arts and music alive in your school? The Grant Helpers can assist you in your grant search and application process.  Contact us today for a free consultation to get started.

Photo Credit: Pawel Loj


 

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Educational Grants That Are Easy to Apply for

Posted by Michelle Hansen on Wed, Sep 20, 2017 @ 11:09 AM

9607386125_200d5cd45a_q.jpgWe often highlight education grants because of the need. According to a story by ABCNews, teachers pay for 77% of the school supplies needed in their own classroom. Even though school is well underway, we’re aware that teachers may still be looking for grants to help provide the supplies students need to learn. The grants below can help provide extra dollars for supplies without requiring intensive time and effort.  

Clif Bar Family Foundation

The Clif Bar Family Foundation awards small grants three times a year. These grants can be for organizational support as well as for funding for specific projects. This funding averages $7,000 per grant. Applications are reviewed three times a year with deadlines of the Feb. 1, Jun. 1, and Oct. 1 (coming right up!). Grants awarded during a particular cycle will be announced at the beginning of the following cycle. Teachers and school administrators looking to apply will focus on the foundation’s community category. In this funding area a California school received funding for its afterschool program and another school has been awarded funding for outdoor education needs.

Technology Teacher Grant

Verizon wants to make sure students know why technology is important and how to use this technology in the classroom as well as in the real world. K-8 teachers are eligible to apply. Teachers hoping to apply must submit a tech-focused lesson plan to teach students about applications for technology in the teacher's specific subject area. The grant comes in the form of a Visa gift card. 1st and 2nd place winners receive $1,000 each, while 3rd-6th place grantees receive $500 each. Applications are due Saturday, Dec. 9.

Lily Sarah Grace

K-5 Title 1 School teachers have until Nov. 30 to apply for a grant from the Lily Sarah Grace Foundation. Projects funded by this program must use arts-infused inquiry-based learning to teach. The project must also focus on the foundation’s five C’s: creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and community. The maximum grant is $450. The story behind this foundation is worth mentioning. Lily, Sarah, and Grace were sisters who lost their lives in a fire. To honor their memory their father started this foundation to support what his daughters loved to do best: art.

Dollar General

This retailer runs the Family Literacy Grants program. Family literacy service providers are eligible to apply. Eligible programs must provide adult education instruction, children’s education, and parent child together time. Colleges, universities, and school districts have been awardees in the past. The 2017 grant program is closed now. The 2018 Family Literacy grant application will be available in Jan. 2018.


You might not need Grant Helper support to apply for these grants, but we are prepared to help with these or others where you want to increase your funding. We are a full-service grant company that aims to find funding for schools, municipalities, and non-profit organizations. In addition to locating grants we can also provide a wide range of services including editing, managing, and applying for grants. Contact us today for a free consultation.

 

Photo Credit: US Department of Education

Topics: education, education funding, education funds, education grant, education grants, education resources, educational funding, educational grants, educational opportunities, school technology grants, grant for school technology, educational technology grants, grants for education, grants for educational technology, art education, art education grant, literacy, literacy grants

Grant Ideas for Educators - Part 2: Finding Support for Your Project

Posted by Tammi Hughes on Wed, Jun 21, 2017 @ 09:06 AM

In our blog article from two weeks ago, we discussed strategies for making your educational grant more fundable. This week’s blog discusses finding a variety of funding avenues to help successfully support your educational project.

Funding Avenues for Schools

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Since we’re a grant helping company, grant funding is an obvious source of financial support. We’re aware that depending on the project, proposal development can present challenges and take a chunk of resources to prepare a competitive proposal. Many funding agencies are experiencing the same cuts schools are, and finding specific grants that are well-suited to specific projects (and in specific geographical areas, etc.) can be difficult. The application process itself can be extensive, particular, and time consuming. We can help with all of steps of this process.  Even with our help, though, our interactive approach still requires an investment of time to plan and present a strong project for funding.

Websites for School Funding

Websites such as DonorsChooseGoFundMe, and others are very popular for educational projects. A simple visit to their websites will show many of the projects they assist in funding. Be sure to read the fine print. For some of these websites, you must give a percentage of the cost of the project back to the site for successful funding of your project. Additionally, most of the time, your project is only funded if it raises the full level of support needed. (You do not keep the portion you raised if you did not meet 100% of your goal.)

Horace Mann Educators Corporation

Horace Mann is a corporation started originally by teachers and for teachers. It focuses on providing teachers with affordable insurance, among other services. One of those services includes helping teachers find funding for the projects they want to execute in their classrooms. Consider contacting your local Horace Mann agent for information on how he or she can assist you in setting up a funding plan for your next project.

Community Support

Community support gets called upon frequently, but if you live in a generous and supportive community, or even if you don’t, consider reaching out to community businesses and services that pair well with your project. For example, maybe a local business would be willing to partially fund a new business development program at your school. You might even offer naming the program or project after the business(es) that support your project and installing a plaque or banner on something more concrete in their honor.


Despite our “Grant Helpers” name, we have helped many clients with multiple types of fundraising.  Contact us to brainstorm ideas at no charge.

Photo credit: Tracy Lawson

Topics: STEM Education, art education, Education grants for Native Americans, art education grant, art grant art education grant, corporate grant for education, early childhood education, education, education funding, education funds, education grant, education grants, education resources, educational funding, educational grants

Grant Ideas for Educators - Part I: Planning for Fundability

Posted by Tammi Hughes on Wed, Jun 7, 2017 @ 10:06 AM

Finding Grants and Other Funds for Education

Summer is upon us, and for many educators school is out for the summer. While summer provides a nice break from the classroom and the routine of plan, teach, and grade, it can also serve as a fantastic opportunity for educators to put their energy into planning for projects or future needs and wants of their schools.2447140827_d0a7e12413_z.jpg

Planning for projects, wants, and needs is one thing. Finding funding in today’s world of budget cuts is a different story. Educators need to keep some core principals in mind and consider multiple methods and avenues of funding. Below are some approaches that we encourage you to keep in mind. Please feel free to contact us if you need additional assistance in developing funding strategies, finding sources, applying for funding, or executing awards.

Strategies for Grant Programs to Propose

1. Consider reach. Most funders want their money to reach as many students as possible, so think of ways your idea could help large numbers of students. For example, a technology cart for a specific classroom teacher will reach only that teacher’s students, whereas one that is utilized by an entire department will likely impact a greater number of students.

2. Consider sustainability. As with “reach,” greater sustainability usually means higher odds of funding. How long will your project sustain itself once funded? For example, that same technology cart might be used across several departments and might include technology that will be available for at least five years into the future. That’s a lot of student reach over time! As a counter-example, funding for a field trip is more short-lived, and while it has an impact on those involved, it is not a sustainable project and has less reach.

3. Consider educational “hot topics.” Movements like STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) get a lot of attention in the educational world right now. How might your project incorporate these areas? For example, if an English teacher wants funding for a writing lab, he or she might be more fundable by considering a writing across the curriculum initiative that invites the mathematics and science departments in writing assignments, research, etc.

4. Consider matching grants. Many funders feel more confident in awarding funding if they know that their efforts are being matched. Perhaps you are looking for $5,000 for a project, but you're aware the funding agency usually awards a maximum of $2,500. Finding additional funding, either through local donors, the school’s budget, or another grant, that will match that amount might give you the edge over someone who does not have matching support. Many funders allow for in-kind matches such as parent volunteer time, use of facilities, and transportation—resources already in use that can be assigned a dollar value.

Finding a potential funding source goes hand-in-hand with identifying fundable programs. In next week’s blog we’ll talk about some potential funding avenues.

Meantime, feel free to contact us with any questions about your search for funding.

Photo credit: Patrick Q

Topics: STEM Education, art education, Education grants for Native Americans, art education grant, art grant art education grant, corporate grant for education, early childhood education, education, education funding, education funds, education grant, education grants, education resources, educational funding, educational grants

Grants for Art Education

Posted by Tammi Hughes on Tue, Dec 13, 2016 @ 17:12 PM

We consistently receive requests to help teachers and principals improve their arts education programs with grant funding. Below we have outlined four hand-picked grants that may help fund your prog2380333875_57c27a15f8_q.jpgrams as well.

Crayola Creative Leadership Grants

This manufacturer’s foundation provides grants for innovative, creative leadership team building within elementary/middle schools. Grants must be submitted by a principal who is a member of the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). To be eligible, your school must form a collaborative team to create unique ways to infuse creativity in the school. Your team’s plans must then be outlined in the application, which can be submitted anytime between now and June 23, 2017. Applications submitted before June 5, 2017 will receive a free Crayola Classpack. Each grant-winning school (up to 20 grants awarded) will receive $2,500 and Crayola products valued at $1,000. Grant awards are announced at the end of October. A winner in 2016, Monett Intermediate School in Missouri, will use its grant to collaborate with the school district’s regional technology center, the community, and local business partners to meet its needs for future designers and problem solvers. Monett will create coaching videos that show how design thinking and mobile maker spaces can enrich learning.

Mary Lou Anderson Grant

Sponsored by the National PTA, the Mary Lou Anderson Grant is a $1,000 award in matching funds to support local PTA arts projects in a school. Funded projects will increase access to learning opportunities in the literary, media, visual, and/or performing arts for at-risk or underserved audiences. Arts projects must actively engage families and community partners to strengthen family-school partnerships. Eligible applicants must be a PTA in good standing, as determined by the state PTA. Three grants were awarded in 2016. Applications for the 2017 grants are due between Jan. 10, 2017 to March 17, 2017.

Buckley Moss Foundation

For educators who need assistance to further their in-school program goals, the P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children’s Education has grants available to teachers who integrate visual art into their classroom curricula, for up to $1,000. Only new or evolving programs that integrate the arts into educational programming are eligible. The purpose is to aid and support teachers who wish to establish an effective learning tool using the arts in teaching children who learn differently. Before-school, after-school, day-care, or Saturday arts programs are not eligible. Deadlines for 2017 have not been released yet though this year applications were accepted in May through September. Check back on the website for more information.  A teacher in Mobile, Ala. received a $1,000 award this year to provide art instruction to students who are not currently benefitting from art education and how art relates to other subjects.

William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

This foundation believes that an effective arts education can nurture a lifelong interest in the arts and reach a broad group of students at an important time in their development. Only California schools and non-profit organizations are eligible to apply. Art programs in school, after school, and out of school are fundable programs. The foundation also awards grants to raise awareness among parents and educators, develop research to inform policymakers, and help set priorities and standards for arts education in schools. Additionally, grants are also given pre-professional training organizations. In 2016, 29 grants were awarded. One recipient was the Young Musicians Choral Orchestra, a winner of $750,000 for general operating support. Grants are accepted throughout the year.


Grants are available for a wide variety of education subjects, not just arts education. We can help you fund bullying programs, technology improvements, safety concerns, and other educational subject matters as well. Contact us today to get started. The first consultation is always free.

 

Photo Credit: Alan Cleaver

Topics: arts, arts grants, grants for the arts, art grant, art grants, art education, art instruction, art education grant, grants for education, grants for art education, education, education funds, education grant, education grants, education funding, educational grants, education resources, educational funding

10 Grants in Your Community

Posted by Mary Ross on Wed, May 20, 2015 @ 11:05 AM

When looking for grants, you may want to start in your own community.  Many businesses that you frequent regularly have foundations set up to support you.  It is worth your time to shoppingconsider what your own community has to offer.  Here are 10 big businesses that make it their business to give back.

Target and Walmart:

    1. The Target Foundation

      Field trips, public safety, social services, Target supports it all.  Field trip grant applications are accepted in August and September, grant applications for the arts are taken in January, and social services applications are due in April.  Grant amounts typically run between $2,000 and $5,000, but you can set your own amount with some grant applications. If you are within a 100-mile radius of a Target store, find their online application and give it a shot.

        2. Walmart Foundation    

          Walmart Foundation grants range in value from $250 to $250,000. Grants are primarily given to non-profit organizations in the areas of “hunger relief, healthy eating, or career opportunity.” The next deadline is July 31, so start crafting your application now.  

          CVS and Walgreens

            3.CVS Health Foundation               

              CVS awards grants in the areas of health care, the environment, economic growth, and children’s needs.  Depending on your focus and grant amounts, deadlines vary. On April 7 CVS Health Foundation announced 55 new grant recipients as part of a $5 million commitment. Check the website for more details and to apply.    

                4. Walgreens Foundation

                  Walgreens supports programs that provide “access to health and wellness in their community, pharmacy education programs and mentoring initiatives, civic and community outreach, and emergency and disaster relief.” A list of information requested for all grant requests is available on the website.  Smaller gifts of merchandise and gift cards bot exceeding $20 can be obtained by contacting your local Walgreens store.

                  Home Depot and Lowes

                    5. The Home Depot Foundation   

                      The Home Depot Foundation funds product grants of up to $5,000 for organizations using volunteers to improve the “physical health of their community.” These grants are for products sold at Home Depot stores. Projects aimed at helping military veterans and/or low income families are favored.  Applications are currently being accepted and organizations can submit their proposals online. 

                        6. The Lowes Foundation

                          In 2014, The Lowes Foundation gave $28 million in charitable donations. The Lowes Foundation supports K-12 public education programs (including technology upgrades, tools for STEM programs, facility renovations, and safety improvements) and community programs (including building renovations/upgrades, grounds improvements, technology upgrades as well as safety improvements).  Grants range from $2,000 to $100,000, and applications are available online now. The spring application cycle ends May 29—so act quickly.  

                           

                          State Farm and Nationwide

                            7. State Farm      

                              With 2016 grant award applications only taken from September 1 to Oct 30, it’s important to plan ahead and have this grant application ready and waiting.  Safety grants, education grants, and service grants are all offered.  Grants must be at least $5,000 and youth-led service grants can range from $25,000 to $100,000.  

                                8. The Nationwide Foundation

                                  The Nationwide Foundation is accepting grant applications now through September 1 to aid people in poverty or crisis, and to improve communities.  Start by taking their eligibility quiz online to see if your organization’s ideals align with theirs.  The Nationwide Foundation also partners with many other organizations such as the United Way, Feeding America, and the American Red Cross.  Giving millions each year in grant funding, consider how Nationwide might be on your side.    

                                  McDonalds and Wendy’s

                                    9. The Ronald McDonald Foundation        

                                      Working to improve the health and well-being of children, The Ronald McDonald Foundation provides grants for dental care, literacy training, and much more.  A new grant cycle will open in July, so read up on what they have funded in the past and tailor your project accordingly (see tip below).

                                        10. The Dave Thomas Foundation 

                                          Working on funding adoption programs?  Wendy’s is: “The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption awards grants to public and private adoption agencies to hire adoption professionals who implement proactive, child-focused recruitment programs targeted exclusively on moving America’s longest-waiting children from foster care into adoptive families.” Take the online quiz to see if you qualify for a grant from the Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program.


                                          When planning your grant proposal, don’t overlook the foundations in your own backyard.  These 10 foundations are giving nationwide and may be a good fit for you. Start your applications today and let us help you with the process.  Contact TheGrantHelpers.com to see how we can work with you to find grants, write grant proposals, and get the funding you need.  

                                           

                                          Photo Credit: Cinzia A. Rizzo

                                          Topics: municipality grants, food program grants, literacy grants, literacy, community development, STEM Education, STEAM grants, education grants, STEM, STEM funding, grants for art education, community engagement, art education grant, art grant, health and wellness funding, health and wellness grants

                                          Grants to Fund Summer Youth Programs

                                          Posted by Mary Ross on Mon, Apr 27, 2015 @ 11:04 AM

                                          Summer school, summer camp, summer programs? What summer situation are you in need of funding? With the school year coming to a rapid end, many parents are looking for activities to keep their kids busy for the summer months, and many foundations are looking to support SummerProgram resized 600organizations that can make this happen.  Time is running out on getting grant funding for this summer, so here is a sampling of the grants you should know about.

                                           

                                          State Farm Youth Advisory Board: Service-Learning Grants 

                                          State Farm is accepting applications now through May 1st for grants of $25,000 to $100,000 that address one of its chosen key areas.  Access to higher education/closing the achievement gap, environmental responsibility, and arts and culture and just a few of these areas. If your summer program helps struggling students, or is centered on the environment or the arts, give these categories a look.  Each of these is described on the website, and an online application is available now.

                                           

                                          The American Honda Foundation

                                          Awarding grants of $25,000 to $75,000 at a time, the American Honda Foundation is accepting online applications from non-profit groups and schools. Generally concerned with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) subjects, Honda is specifically looking to fund programs “which are characterized by the following qualities: imaginative, creative, youthful, forward-thinking, scientific, humanistic and innovative.” Organizations can submit applications at any time, but only one application can be submitted per 12-month period. This is a national program hoping to achieve long-term benefits.    

                                           

                                          The Mitsubishi Electric American Foundation

                                          Will your organization’s summer work have a national impact? Look into an MEAF grant.  The Mitsubishi Electric American Foundation is accepting applications until June 1st.  MEAF prefers to support programs that teach leadership skills and help youth with disabilities. Six to 12 grants of $10,000 to $75,000 are given a year.  "EcoChanges," a program that gives youth with disabilities the chance to participate in outdoor activities, is one that MEAF has funded in the past.  Take the “grant eligibility quiz” on the website to see if your organization should apply.

                                           

                                          The Captain Planet Foundation 

                                          The Captain Plant Foundation funds as many small project grants, between $500 and $2,500, as its yearly resources allow.  With rolling deadlines throughout the year, Captain Planet grants are awarded to schools and non-profit organizations for student-led, project-based environmental programs. Organizations can apply online now. Captain Planet funds projects that get kids involved in protecting the earth and using its resources.  In addition to supporting garden programs, The Captain Planet Foundation even puts on its own Earth Day Celebration for kids in its local area of Atlanta.

                                           

                                          Where will your organization get its funding this summer? If you’d like to know about more grant opportunities and get help finding grants specifically tailored to your group, contact TheGrantHelpers.com. We have the resources you need, and the first consultation is always free.  

                                           

                                          Photo Credit Camp PinewoodBy: Camp Pinewood

                                          Topics: education, education resources, education funds, educational opportunities, art grant art education grant, educational funding, education grants, education funding, educational grants, grants for education, enviornmental grants, enviornmental funding, environmental education, grants for art education, art instruction, education grant, environment grant, art education grant, grants for the arts, art grant, environmental grant, art education

                                          Grants for Art Education

                                          Posted by Michelle Hansen on Thu, Oct 9, 2014 @ 14:10 PM

                                          The Chicago Public Schools (CPS), one of the largest school systems in the country, recently unveiled a first-of-its kind analysis of arts education offerings, staffing, partnersarthips, and funding in CPS during the 2012-13 school year. This report found that elementary students on average received 99 minutes of arts education per week. As part of the district’s arts guidelines, elementary schools should provide at least 120 minutes per week. But, according to the self-reported data, only 40 percent of CPS elementary schools offered that much arts education. Additionally, the report found that 95 percent of elementary/middle schools, and 88 percent of high schools, had at least one part- or full-time arts instructor. That means there are some schools that have no arts instruction by a certified arts teacher.  

                                          The CPS report also found that over 400 arts organizations had active partnerships with CPS schools to provide arts programming to students either before, during, or after school. Some of these partnerships included one-time events like field trips or performances while others included active ongoing art instruction and education with students.    

                                          It’s understandable why CPS had so many problems fitting arts education into the day. Education goals in the United States are an ever-changing cocktail of math, science, language, arts, and more. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), the focus of the last decade, has now evolved into STEAM, with the addition of arts into the education focus. For some schools, this change is a tough drink to swallow, just one more thing to fund with dwindling budgets. Below are some school grants for art opportunities that we selected to help with this new focus on arts education. Some of these are just for schools/educators while some grants could be used by non-profit organizations to create a partnership with a school.

                                          The National Art Education Foundation (NAEF)

                                          NAEF has five different grant programs that support a wide variety of arts education and instruction programs. If you want to apply for these grants, plan ahead. The deadline for the 2015 funding has already passed. Look for applications for 2016 to be due in October 2015. The grants available include:

                                          • Ruth Halvorsen Professional Development Grants are awarded to projects focused on understanding, implementation, and issues specifically relating to the National Visual Arts Standards and support the improvement of the teaching of art. Grants total up to $2,500.

                                          • Mary McMullan Grants fund projects that promote art education in all levels of schooling. Grants total up to $2,500.

                                          • NAEA Research Grants support research that advances art education. The maximum amount for these grants is $10,000.

                                          • SHIP Grants are given to educators for equipment and instructional curriculum resources. Grants total $500.

                                          • Teacher Incentive Grants cover a wide array of subjects that promote the teaching of art. These can include but are not limited to curriculum materials, student instruction materials, and student assessment materials.

                                          National Endowment for the Arts / Art Works

                                          Art Works provides funds for projects that support arts in K-12 classrooms as well as educators in those classrooms. There are three types of grants under this program, and grants fund all artistic disciplines. It is anticipated applications will be accepted in February and July. The three categories include the following:

                                          • Direct Learning Grants fund projects that increase student knowledge and skills in the arts by engaging students to professional artists and arts educators.

                                          • Professional Development Grants are for projects that assist educators and/or civic leaders in their arts education and development.

                                          • Collective Impact Grants hope to ensure that all students across entire schools, school districts, and/or states participate in the arts over time. These projects are larger in scope and qualifying projects should have the potential to be shared with other communities.

                                          The Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation

                                          Schools serving low-income students can apply for funds from this foundation to help with musical instrument repair and the acquisition of new instruments. Schools must serve a population of at least 65% that participate in the National Lunch Program. Private schools that do not participate in the National Lunch Program must serve a minimum of 65% of students that attend at no cost due to low income status. Additionally, schools must have an established instrumental music program that has been offered during the regular school day for a minimum of three consecutive years. Application deadlines will be announced this month.  

                                          Champion Creatively Alive Children

                                          Crayola sponsors this grant program to fund elementary school programs that construct creative leadership team building in arts education. Eligible projects will need to form a collaborative team to plan unique ways to infuse art throughout the school. In order to apply, principals of the applying school must be members of the National Association of Elementary School Principals. Each grant-winning school (up to 20 grants awarded) receives $2,500 and Crayola products valued at $1,000. Applications are due June 22, 2015. Every application submitted prior to June 8, 2015 will receive a free Crayola product Classpack.

                                           

                                          Photo Credit: Alan Cleaver

                                          Topics: grant notification, grants for art education, art instruction, music grants, grants for new music instruments, grants for music education, grant opportunity, art education grant, school grant, art education

                                          Impact of Arts Education on Student Achievement

                                          Posted by Alisyn Franzen on Tue, Apr 16, 2013 @ 20:04 PM

                                          In making the case for funding, it’s hard to overerestimate the importance of first establishing the need for funding. Funders can’t be expected to have a deep understanding of the need in your particular area. While we are not suggesting you write a thesis on the topic, it's important to clearly and authoritatively describe the need for and the benefits of your grant proposal.

                                          With that in mind, we offer you a few data points about the positive impact of arts education on student achievement. These points suggest the types of arguments you could include in a proposal. As always, feel free to contact us if we can help you with wording of a component of your proposal or help you on a larger scale.

                                           

                                          Where does the U.S. rank in cognitive skills and educational achievement?

                                          Art EducationIn November 2012, Pearson, an educational firm, published The Learning Curve, a report aimed at bettering our understanding of the economic and social factors that lead to successful educational outcomes. According this report, the United States ranks 17th in the index of cognitive skills and educational achievement, well-behind other developed countries across the world. (The top ten countries were: 1) Finland; 2) South Korea; 3) Hong Kong – China; 4) Japan; 5) Singapore; 6) United Kingdom; 7) Netherlands; 8) New Zealand; 9) Switzerland; and 10) Canada.)

                                          As a result of ongoing budget cuts at the state and federal level, schools are facing difficult decisions about how to stretch their already dwindling budgets. Arts education programs, not considered to be part of the academic core, are among the first to go. While most would agree that cutting any educational programs is a harmful practice, cutting arts education programs might be more devastating than many realize, as there is a clear correlation between the arts and student development and achievement.

                                           

                                          How does arts education impact student achievement?

                                          Sir Ken Robinson, an international specialist in creativity, addressed the need for arts education in a TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talk entitled “Schools Kill Creativity.”  You will find, by watching this address, an entertainingly presented rationale for the importance of maintaining the instrinsic creative skills of children as they face an ever more volitale and uncertain future.  Sir Robinson's reasoning could comfortably be integrated into a proposal's main argument for funding.

                                          In a May 2002 report titled “The Impact of Arts Education on Workforce Preparation,”  published by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, it is said that, “The arts provide one alternative for states looking to build the workforce of tomorrow.” It is added that the general student population experienced increase academic performance, reduced absenteeism, and better skill-building when exposed to more arts education opportunities.

                                          The same report claimed, “For at-risk youth,… the arts contribute to lower recidivism rates; increased self-esteem; the acquisition of job skills; and the development of much needed creative thinking, problem solving, and communication skills.”

                                          According to Americans for the Arts, arts education “stimulates and develops the imagination and critical thinking, and refines cognitive and creative skills.” Problem-solving, critical thinking, team-building, life skills, and quality of task performance are among the many other areas that are better developed in students and children with more exposure to arts education.

                                          The Americans for the Arts website contributes a substantial list the impact of arts education on social, academic, physical, and sensory indicators including:

                                          • As children describe people and things in their world using pictures, body movements, and mime, they enhance their descriptive, nonverbal, cognitive capabilities
                                          • Drawing, sculpting, and other visual arts develop spatial acuity.
                                          • Group activities, such as learning dance steps or singing songs, build social skills.
                                          • Repeating stories, poems, and songs strengthens memory.
                                          • Dramatic play, rhyming games, and songs are some of the language-rich activities build pre-reading skills.
                                          • Listening to music for an hour a day changes brain organization, allowing greater brain coherence.

                                          Numerous studies over the last two decades have confirmed the positive correlation that arts education has on student achievement. With this knowledge in mind, it is vital to our students’ education and the promotion of a positive and productive future that funding continues for arts education programs across all grade levels.

                                           


                                          In our work, we encounter many arts education grants. We have hand-selected a few of our favorites to share with you. Please see our education page to see these select few, and remember there are many, many more. If you need assistance finding more arts education grants, simply ask one of our experts for more information.

                                          Remember that The Grant Helpers are here to help you reach your funding goals. If you have any questions about grants, your fundability, or our services, please do not hesitate to contact one of our grant experts. Our initial consultations are always free. You can also sign up for our Grants Watch List, a complimentary service, in which we will alert you when we find grants that might fit your funding needs.

                                           

                                          Image credit: US Department of Education

                                          Topics: educational funding, making case for funding, education grant, grant opportunity, grant strategy, art education grant, grant tips, art grant, art education