Grant Writing Advice and Tips: The Grant Helpers Blog

Disaster Relief Grants for School Libraries

Posted by Lauren Albright on Thu, May 10, 2018 @ 11:05 AM
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Harvey. Irma. Maria. Communities devastated by these three hurricanes in 2017 are still rebuilding. The massive recovery process takes its toll on a community’s economy, infrastructure, and education system—the latter having a damaging long-term impact on students.

Many grant foundations recognize that learning includes the resources of both classrooms and libraries. By offering funds to rebuild school libraries in these disaster-stricken areas, foundations are investing in the future. Students in schools with endorsed librarians score better on standardized achievement tests (Library Research Service, 2013). Additionally, schools with strong library programs have higher graduation rates, especially for vulnerable or disadvantaged student bodies (Texas Computer Education Association, 2017).

If your school’s library faced severe damage from a recent natural disaster, the following organizations may be able to assist. When applying, emphasize the positive impact of your school library on students and families—for example, better test scores, higher graduation rates, increased cultural awareness, and improved literacy—to demonstrate the importance of your funding request. 

Beyond Words: The Dollar General School Library Relief Fund

If you work in a public school that has suffered substantial damage due to a natural disaster in the past three years and is located within 20 miles of a Dollar General store, the Beyond Words fund may be able to assist. Money from this grant can help you purchase books, media, and/or library equipment to restock the school library and support student achievement. Awards range from $10,000-$20,000. The Beyond Words grant prioritizes schools with the greatest need in terms of the extent of damage to the school library collection, impact on the library program, and impact on student enrollment, among other factors. Applications, available online, are accepted on an ongoing basis.

Additionally, each year the grant offers “catastrophic awards” of $50,000 to two applicant organizations that have suffered a loss of 90% or greater of their school library resources. No additional application is required to be considered for the catastrophic awards.

Inspire Disaster Recovery Grant

School librarians who are members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) may apply for an Inspire Disaster Recovery Grant. This fund offers $30,000 annually to public middle school and high school libraries that have incurred damage or hardship due to a natural disaster within the past three years. Funds can be used to replace or supplement books, media, and/or library equipment. Interested applicants should submit a two-page narrative that describes their need and how they will use the funds, along with a project plan and timeline, a list of key staff involved in the grant, and an itemized budget. Applications are accepted year-round.

The Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries

Since 2002, The Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries has awarded more than $13 million to 2,500 schools in need. This year, in light of the devastation caused by catastrophic hurricanes and devastating wildfires, the foundation is dedicating its resources to help schools rebuild their book collections. If your school library was affected by one of the 2017 hurricanes (Harvey, Irma, or Maria) or the California wildfires, you may be eligible for this funding opportunity. All schools serving pre-kindergarten through 12th grade—including public, charter, private, and parochial schools—may apply. Grants for this special disaster relief project may range from $10,000-$75,000. Funds may be used to purchase books (print or Braille) and magazine subscriptions. The grant application is available online, and grants are awarded on a rolling basis.

For more information about grants for general disaster relief, visit our blog post on this topic. For organizations wishing to focus on disaster prevention and preparedness, a list of resources is available in our blog post from March 2018.


Do you need information about other types of disaster relief grant opportunities? We can help find specific grant opportunities to meet your organization’s needs with our specialized Grant Opportunity Search. Find out more on our services page. Or start a free consultation with one of our grant experts by contacting us today.


Citation

Texas Computer Education Association: https://www.tcea.org/blog/importance-of-school-libraries/

Library Research Service: https://www.lrs.org/documents/school/school_library_impact.pdf

Photo Credit: Lutfi Gaos

Topics: education, natural disaster, grants for disaster relief, disaster relief grants, disaster, Disaster Relief Grants for School Libraries, school library grants, school libraries

Grants for Emergency Relief

Posted by Tammi Hughes on Thu, Aug 31, 2017 @ 09:08 AM

3620709165_534337ca49_q.jpgHurricane Harvey is causing catastrophic and unprecedented damage and flooding in Texas. Harvey has caused at least 16 confirmed deaths and inland flooding is ongoing in the Greater Houston area. FEMA director Brock Long called Harvey the worst disaster in Texas history, and expected the recovery to take many years. Preliminary estimates of economic losses range anywhere from $10 billion to $50 billion.

To help to those in need, please visit the American Red Cross site for Hurricane Harvey specific donations.

There are grants available to help with emergency needs for organizations as well as community clean up grants to assist with recovery from a disaster. See some of these available grants below and for more opportunities contact us.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

One of this foundation’s goals is to “reduce suffering and save lives in regions affected by natural disasters.” In addition to providing monetary support for emergency relief, this foundation also assists with strengthening the capacity of emergency responders as well as researching new ways to provide disaster assistance. Under emergency relief, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation supports basic relief support—including food, water, sanitation and hygiene, healthcare, and shelter—in the acute phases of complex emergencies. Non-profit organizations are eligible to apply.

Lions Club

When disaster strikes, get in touch with your local Lions Club. Local Lions Clubs can award local grants with money from Lions Club International. The local Lions Club can deem where it awards the grants, so contact the club for specific requirements. There are three grants available:

  1. Disaster Preparedness Grants - These grants help prepare for future disasters. The aim is to bring volunteers from the Lions Club together with emergency personnel and community organizations, to have plans in place before a disaster strikes. These grants range from $5,000 to $10,000. Local funds must account for 10% of the grant request. Priority will be given to districts susceptible to regular and repeated natural disasters.
  2. Emergency Grants - Grants of up to $10,000 are available for communities hit by a natural disaster that has affected at least 100 people. Grants in this category should help with an urgent need for water, food, clothing, medical supplies, blankets, and cleaning supplies not available from other agencies. When a tornado struck Joplin, Missouri, this grant was used to fund 120 meals a day for an emergency shelter that housed people who lost their homes.
  3. Community Recovery Grants - This set of grants is aimed to help with short-term clean-up and repair efforts where immediate needs have already been addressed. These grants total $20,000 and are for current disasters only where at least 100 people have been affected. Construction projects are not eligible. Eligible projects include equipment for debris removal, coordination of blood drives, equipment and supplies for minor repairs of public institutions, and temporary eye clinics for replacement of eyeglasses.

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Normally this foundation does not accept unsolicited applications. With the emergent and unprecedented nature of Hurricane Harvey we believe this foundation may be willing to help since one of its main priorities is supporting disaster relief and long-term recovery. The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation has assisted financially with events such as the Syrian Refugee Crisis and Ebola Virus Epidemic in West Africa. Thus far in 2017, the foundation has given $1 million in grants to disaster relief and recovery. We suggest contacting this foundation and initiating a relationship to see if grant money will be available.


We are a full-service grant company with a wide variety of services. Contact us today for a free phone consultation with one of our expert Grant Helpers.


Photo Credit: Maxstrz

 

Topics: emergency preparedness resources, disaster preparedness, natural disaster, emergency preparedness, grants for disaster relief, disaster relief grants, Hurricane Harvey

Disaster Relief, Preparedness Grants

Posted by Tammi Hughes on Thu, Mar 2, 2017 @ 12:03 PM

3791340426_2b3d6b15b2_q.jpgAs the thunder rolls and the threat of tornados lurks in our home state of Illinois we thought it an appropriate time to share grants that help prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters, both natural and man made. Read below for three grants that can help your organization be prepared.

Hospital Preparedness Program

The Department of Health and Human Services wants to ensure communities are prepared for public health emergencies. The hospital preparedness grant program is intended to support the U.S. public health and healthcare systems. Eligible applicants include state, city, or county governments. Grant money is intended to be used to build and sustain their public health and healthcare preparedness capabilities, ensuring that federal preparedness funds are directed to priority areas within their jurisdictions as identified through their strategic planning efforts. Awardees must assure that their implementation activities and programs effectively meet the needs of at-risk individuals. Deadline for application submission is April 3. The minimum grant award is $300,000, with an award ceiling of $42 million.

Kiwanis Children’s Fund

Build a relationship with your local Kiwanis Club in order to be a recipient of a grant from the Kiwanis Children’s Fund. These disaster relief grants are intended to help Kiwanis clubs and districts meet crucial, immediate needs. Grants are designed to support Kiwanis-led relief efforts to meet the most urgent needs of victims immediately following natural disasters. The grant money must be used to address the immediate needs of disaster victims in the wake of a natural disaster. Types of activities supported include: food, bottled water, clothing, first aid supplies, cleaning supplies, and toiletries. This grant is not available to address long-term needs that may include building or rebuilding homes and replacing personal and household items. In the event of an emergency, contact your local Kiwanis club for assistance.

FEMA Non-Disaster Grants

The Federal Emergency Management Administration’s (FEMA) non-disaster grant programs provide funding to enhance state and emergency responders to prevent, respond to, and recover from terrorism incidents. The grant programs provide funding to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as to transportation authorities, nonprofit organizations, and the private sector. Dedicated funding is provided for law enforcement and terrorism prevention throughout the country to prepare for, prevent, and respond to pre-operational activity and other crimes that are precursors or indicators of terrorist activity. Last year, eight different grant programs totaling more than $1.6 billion were funded. Last year applications were due in April. The deadlines for 2017 have not been announced yet.


As always, TheGrantHelpers.com is available to assist you! We'd be happy to offer you a complimentary "grant readiness" consultation. Just contact us today.

 

Photo Credit: Jared Hatfield

Topics: disaster preparedness, natural disaster, grants for disaster planning, grant opportunity, grants, grants for disaster relief, disaster relief grants, grants for disaster preparedness, disaster preparedness grants

Grants for Disaster Preparedness, Relief

Posted by Michelle Hansen on Thu, Oct 13, 2016 @ 11:10 AM

16551421138_4bc2a10225_q.jpgHurricane Matthew was an unwanted guest along the east coast and in several islands over the weekend. Matthew hit Florida, Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. More than 20 people in the U.S. died. Now, North Carolina is dealing with massive flooding that’s left about 1,500 stranded. And more than 1,000 people in Haiti died when the hurricane hit the country last week.

This is the perfect time to bring awareness to grants that both help prepare for natural disasters before they occur and assist people after disasters strike. See a sampling of these grants below, and don’t hesitate to contact us for more questions.

Lions Club International Foundation

This service organization, normally associated with helping with vision concerns, actually has four different grant programs dedicated to preparing for or helping with disasters. In the last 10 years, the foundation has awarded more than $100 million in these types of grants. Applications for these grants must be submitted to the local Lions Club where the disaster has occurred, so building a relationship with your local club is vital. See details on the all four of the grants below.

  1. Disaster Preparedness Grants- These grants help prepare for future disasters. The aim is to bring volunteers from the Lions Club together with emergency personnel and community organizations, in order to have plans in place before a disaster strikes. These grants range from $5,000 to $10,000. Local funds must account for 10% of the grant request. Priority will be given to districts susceptible to regular and repeated natural disasters.
  2. Emergency Grants- Grants of up to $10,000 are available for communities hit by a natural disaster that has affected at least 100 people. Grants in this category should help with an urgent need for water, food, clothing, medical supplies, blankets, and cleaning supplies not available from other agencies. When a tornado struck Joplin, Missouri, this grant was used to fund 120 meals a day for an emergency shelter that housed people who lost their homes.
  3. Community Recovery Grants- This set of grants is aimed to help with short-term clean up and repair efforts where immediate needs have already been addressed. These grants total $20,000 and are for current disasters only where at least 100 people have been affected. Construction projects are not eligible. Eligible projects include equipment for debris removal, coordination of blood drives, equipment and supplies for minor repairs of public institutions, and temporary eye clinics for replacement of eyeglasses.
  4. Major Catastrophe Grants- These grants cannot be applied for by organizations and instead are directed by the foundation’s board of trustees. These grants are awarded for long-term reconstruction projects like those after Hurricane Katrina in the U.S or the Nepal earthquake.

Gates Foundation

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation gives grants in several different areas, one being emergency relief. They support three different types of emergencies: rapid-onset emergencies, complex emergencies, and slow-onset emergencies. The largest portion of emergency relief grant money goes to rapid-onset emergencies. These types of emergencies are high-impact emergencies such as typhoons or disease outbreaks. This funding aims to help with immediate needs including food, shelter, water, and more. The Gates Foundation also funds complex emergencies, which often include violent elements and disruption of national systems. This money will also fund immediate basic human needs. The last category of funding is slow-onset emergencies. These are classified as events along the lines of drought and famine, whose negative consequences build over time. Grant money in this program must support programs that help build stability in communities. Requests for Proposals are published on the foundation’s website.

Disabled American Veterans

For organizations aiming to assist veterans during emergencies, a great place to start is the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) grant program. This grant program supports veterans that have been the victim of isolated or specific disasters. These grants may be issued for the purpose of providing financial aid, food, clothing and temporary shelter. DAV supply kits – which include backpacks, blankets and hygiene kits – are also provided. Individual veterans and their family members are also eligible to supply directly for this grant program.


When disaster strikes, or if you are looking to fund something else, consider TheGrantHelpers.com. Contact TheGrantHelpers.com to see how we can find the grant you need and work with you to create an application that attracts those funds.

Topics: emergency preparedness grants, emergency preparedness resources, emergency management services, disaster preparedness, natural disaster, grants for disaster planning, emergency preparedness, grants for disaster relief, disaster relief grants, grants for disaster preparedness, disaster preparedness grants