Food & Nutrition Grant Opportunities

 

NOTE: This list includes archived grant opportunities; not all opportunities are currently available. However, many funding opportunities are cyclical, so it would be in your best interest to keep closed opportunities in mind for future funding needs.

Please remember these are just a select few of the many grant opportunities available for food and nutrition funding. If you are interested in joining our free Watch List for food and nutrition grants, please fill out the form to the right.

The ConAgra Foods Foundation offers annual grants for nonprofit organizations. Grants are awarded to organizations that address child hunger and nutrition. ConAgra gives funding priority to organizations focusing on direct services, capacity building, and advocacy interventions. This foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals, and it awards grants only to states in certain states: Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Oregon, Tennessee, and Washington. Special preference is given to organizations serving African American, Hispanic, and Native American children. Counties with 100 or more ConAgra Foods employees and/or a child food insecurity rate of 30% or higher will also receive preference.

The No Kid Hungry campaign is focused on trying to eliminate hunger among children in America by supporting nutrition programs and educating low-income families on how to stretch their budgets while still making healthy food choices at home. The average grant size is between $5,000 - $10,000, and priority is given to nonprofit organizations, schools, and other organizations that are eligible by participating in activities like increasing access to afterschool snack and meal programs, increasing school breakfast availability, and advocacy of certain anti-hunger issues.

The Campbell’s Soup Foundation offers grants to nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations in locations where the company has plant facilities. Organizations do not have to be located in these communities to qualify for the grants, but they must serve these communities: Davis, Dixon, Sacramento, and Stockton, CA; Bloomfield and Norwalk, CT; Lakeland, FL; Downers Grove, IL; Maxton, NC; Camden and South Plainfield, NJ; Napoleon and Willard, OH; Denver and Downington, PA; Aiken, SC; Paris, TX; Richmond, UT; Everett, WA; Milwaukee, WI. The foundation focuseson relieving hunger and on childhood obesity. It also focuses on funding applicants who have an ongoing relationship and that make a positive impact on the youth living in Campbell's and Pepperidge Farm communities. There are two grant cycles each year: January – April and August – November, so check the website frequently for new announcements.

The USDA Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food organization offers more than two dozen programs that can help communities build local and regional food systems. Some of these programs include helping farmers extend their growing seasons, assisting growers cooperatives looking to build or rebuild a food hub, helping farmers markets accept SNAP benefits, etc. The USDA offers a multitude of grants and programs that can help all types of individuals and organizations with agricultural production and food security programs. A good place to begin is at the USDA’s Grant, Loans, and Support webpage. The USDA blog allows potential applicants to stay on top of the latest announcements and updates to its programs.