Grant Services - Advice and Tips

Strategic Decisions Regarding Letters of Introduction

Tue, Oct 30, 2018 @ 10:10 AM / by Carol Timms posted in LOI, grant tips, Grant Writing Tips, grants, letter of intent, letter proposal, Grant Writing and Planning, grants writing, grant planning, applying for grants, grant funding, grant, grant proposal, grant strategies, grant project development, securing grants

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Many grantmaking organizations—especially small, private foundations—do not accept proposals for initial funding requests. Instead, they require grantseekers to submit a letter of introduction (LOI), also known as a letter of interest, letter of inquiry, letter of intent, or letter of request (LOR). Often, LOIs are requested by foundations as a tool to determine which projects they will be invited to submit a full proposal. While each grantmaking organization’s requirements for these letters may vary, most funders want LOIs of no more than one to three pages that describe the project for which you’re requesting funding and indicate the amount of funding for which you’re asking.

But is writing LOIs (as opposed to grant proposals) really worth doing? There are two main strategic approaches to consider: sending many LOIs – vs- fewer full proposals. To determine the best strategy for your organization, consider some of the general pros and cons of LOI writing when seeking grant funding.

Pros

-- LOIs are brief and quick to write.

Most full grant proposals require multiple pages of specific information regarding your funding request, including a project description, timeline, itemized budget, and measurable goals and outcomes. Therefore, planning your project and then writing a good proposal can take days, weeks, or even months. Because LOIs require much less verbiage and rely on more general information, an experienced writer can prepare a persuasive LOI quickly. If you have a collection of documents and text from other proposals and LOIs, the task can be even easier.

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Grants for Art and Music Education

Thu, Sep 27, 2018 @ 12:09 PM / by Lauren Albright posted in educational grants, 501(c)(3), funding sources, grants for art education, art instruction, music grants, grants for new music instruments, schol grants, grants for music education, art education grant, grants for the arts, art grant, arts grants, school grant, youth education, arts, at risk youth, youth grants, disadvantaged youth, disadvantaged youth grants, art grants, music education grants, grants for youth, grants for at risk youth, grant, grant proposal, steam, steam education grants, grants for children, performing arts

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Grants for Art and Music Education

“Where words fail, music speaks.”
–Hans Christian Andersen

“A work of art is above all an adventure of the mind.”
-Eugene Ionesco

It is well established that art and music education help students develop and excel in many important physical, mental, and social learning aspects.
Yet these education programs are often the first on the chopping block when federal, state, and school organizations struggle with dwindling education budgets. For those schools and teachers struggling to maintain crucial art and music programs due to financial constraints, grants are one of many great resources for support.

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The National Endowment for the Arts

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) funds new and existing projects that promote the arts. NEA grants are available to non-profit organizations, state or local government agencies, school districts, and federally-recognized tribal communities or tribes; all applicant entities must have at least a three-year prior history of arts programming.

Two of the NEA’s four annual grants are currently open for the 2018 cycle: 

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Grants to Help the Homeless

Wed, Aug 29, 2018 @ 13:08 PM / by Vickie Garton-Gundling posted in human services grants, homelessness grants, homeless shelter grants, critical needs, homelessness, grants for Underprivileged, grants for human services, finding funding, Underprivileged, grants for poverty assistance, grants for substance abuse, at risk youth, youth grants, grants for law enforcement, grants for homlessness, grants for homeless shelters, at risk youth grants, grant funding, grant, grant proposal, mental health grants, grants for drug abuse, grants for mental health, substance abuse treatment grants, homeless veterans grants, grants to end homelessness, grants for homelessness, grants for homeless veterans, unemployment grants, unemployment assistance

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Grants to Help the Homeless

While many people experience America as a “land of plenty,” with opportunities and creature comforts abounding, sadly nearly 554,000 people in our country do not have a home (U.S. News, 2017). Many different factors can lead to homelessness, including economic factors, mental health, and situational issues. Therefore, organizations that seek to combat homelessness must use a variety of techniques and offer diverse services to tackle this multifaceted problem. Whether your non-profit agency seeks funding for programs to support immediate basic needs for those who are homeless or to create long-term housing and solutions, a number of different grants are available to help finance this important work to assist some of our nation’s most vulnerable residents.

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Bank of America Economic Mobility Grants

For 2018, Bank of America is offering two different economic mobility-focused grant programs to organizations that assist vulnerable populations, including the homeless:

The first grant program supports non-profit agencies that assist homeless individuals and families. This grant funds a variety of initiatives that directly help the homeless, such as programs that provide the basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter or job-training programs.  Applications for the Economic Mobility Grant are typically due in February of each year.

The second grant program focuses on broader community and social programs, including larger-scale programs whose trickle-down effect will ultimately help reduce homelessness rates. For instance, organizations that seek to build transitional or long-term housing specifically for vulnerable populations, including the homeless, are eligible for this grant opportunity. The application period for this second grant type is usually in the month of June each year.

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